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check_esx_vdf.pl

Current Version
0.02
Last Release Date
2011-07-27
Compatible With
  • Nagios 2.x
  • Nagios 3.x
License
GPL
Hits
86649
Files:
FileDescription
check_esx_vdf.plcheck_esx_vdf.pl
Network Monitoring Software - Download Nagios XI
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Netflow Analysis Software - Nagios Network Analyzer - Download
This script allows you to check the vmfs volumes of your VMware ESX environment (akin to check_disk); includes a working pnp4nagios template.

It only works up to ESX 3.5, and hasn't been updated yet. If you want this to work for a newer version of ESX, you have to use a wholly different approach. Leave a note, and I may decide to update the script :-)
== Requirements ==
This script needs a running snmpd on the ESX server you use for checking with the following addition to its snmpd.conf:

exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.6876.99999.1 vdf /usr/sbin/vdf

A pnp4nagios template can be found at the end of this file!


== Usage examples ==

C:ProgrammeNSClient++scripts>perl check_esx_vdf.pl -H esxhostname -w 85 -c 90 -s vmfsvolumename -f
OK - vmfs partition '/vmfs/volumes/vmfsvolumename' is at 737/999G (73% in use) | vmfs_vmfsvolumename=772988904;891065777;995868163;0;
C:ProgrammeNSClient++scripts>

C:ProgrammeNSClient++scripts>perl check_esx_vdf.pl -H esxhostname -w 85 -c 90 -s vmfsvolumename
CRITICAL - vmfs partition '/vmfs/volumes/vmfsvolumename' is at 902/999G (90% in use)
C:ProgrammeNSClient++scripts>






The perfdata problem is now fixed. If you can, please remove this phrase from the final text that is being published, dear Editor(s) :o)
Reviews (1)
byPriyabs, December 5, 2017
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Hi,

Is it possible to have similar plugin for ESXi 5.5 ?

Thanks,
Priyanka
Owner's reply

VMware decided to (at least) strip down their ESX image enough so you can't use normal linux software any longer, so no, at this time, there is no way to do something similar to what my script does.

BUT you can use the (kinda bloated and slow, yet powerful) check_vmware_esx by Consol Labs, which is using the Perl API VMware ESX provides, to get similar and more information.